Sunday, January 23, 2011

Help Wanted: Ogden City Seeks Sports Complex Architect

Anybody want to take a wild guess who'll ultimately wind up with the contract?

Thanks to a tip from gentle reader ND, we learn this morning that Boss Godfrey's administration has placed the following "help wanted" ad in the Standard-Examiner, seeking "sealed Proposals from Architectural firms interested in providing architectural and design services" for a gigantic but unnamed "Ogden sports complex":
The Godfrey administration has already caught embarrassing public flak for its retroactive waiver of competitive Field House architectural bidding, and for secretly funneling $5,000 to Boss Godfrey's hand-chosen current architect, Dan Van Zeben.

It appears that Boss Godfrey is now trying to "cure" the non-competitive bidding problem... retroactively, of course.

Theoretically, this morning's ad opens the door to any architectural firm which might desire to bid its services for this project.

Realistically however, anybody want to take a wild guess who'll ultimately wind up with this contract, assuming that the City Council is willing to approve further architectural funding?

14 comments:

Dan S. said...

Interesting timing, advertising for an architect before they have money to pay one. I suppose they plan to go to the council soon and ask for some money for this purpose, but they know the council will refuse if competitive bidding has been bypassed. I wonder how the council feels about the $5000 already funneled to Van Zeben?

RFP Reader said...

Carefully read this part of the RFP......

All work, materials, and product, including production costs, will be paid for on a contingency basis. Payment will be made at the time Ogden City has an approved and funded capital improvement project for the proposed facility. There is no guarantee that the capital improvement project will be approved or funded, in which case, the successful applicant will be reimbursed no more than five thousand ($5,000) for materials and costs for producing displays, models or printed materials. Ogden City shall retain exclusive ownership and control of any and all finished work, including but not limited to all drawings, designs, and schematics.


Interesting that the same amount is $5000. Also interesting is that the fees are "contigent" on project approval....so basically you do the work and if it gets funded then you get paid.....pretty weak RFP for such a large project....

Dan S. said...

Good point, RFPR. If Van Zeben gets the contract, does he get an additional $5000? So he would end up getting paid twice what anyone else would for the same sketches?

And if so, or if they were to hire someone else, where are they gonna find another $5k?

RFP Reader said...

Well, 5k is bupkis for a project of this size....proposing services to be "on the come" is trying to either take advantage of people or the fix is in....

Curmudgeon said...

I am not an architect, so I don't know what common practice is in the trade. When RFPs are sent out for projects like this, isn't what's expected a general design concept [not fully developed plans, blueprints, etc.]? Much like what Dan posted earlier [artist's sketch, overall layout, etc.]?

And in the trade, if say a bank asked for proposals from architects for a new bank HQ building, would the firms making a proposal expect to get paid for the preliminary work that submit as part of their proposal hoping to win the contract, or not?

Just trying to get some idea of what is the usual practice in the trade. Anyone know?

RFP Reader said...

That may be the case if it was a design competition and a stipend was offered. Proposals are typically qualification based...go check out the state of utah requirements for submitting proposals for thier RFP's. Think of it this way ...would a contractor go and build a building as part of thier bid roposal then see if they get the job?....design is one of the architects core business components...and as they say in most things...you get what you pay for.

RFP Reader said...

Oh...lets not forget.....Organizations that put out these type of RFP's have the money in place to do them.

Biker Babe said...

After reading the RFP -- I wonder how many GOOD firms will actually bid ... the part about the successful bidder getting $5K was real vague

... there is no guarantee the ... CIP ... will be approved or funded ... in which case ... [payola of $5K]

does that mean the successful bidder will get paid $5K if the project is approved/funded? Why would anyone bid on something that may not be funded ... seems a waste of manpower/money in a squeaky construction economy ...

does it mean the successful bidder will get paid $5K even if the project isn't funded, and their bid drawings and all will become property of OGden City, regardless?

Hmmm ... and all this after the oscar mayor weiner signed a retroactive waiver for RFPs, then publishes an RFP ... after already giving $5K to VanZeben

js

what will it cost us said...

where is the mayot getting $5K here, funds that appear out of nowhere?

When will the city council have an independent audit of the money coming into the city and what is paid out. Do we even know if the junction is paying their lease payments on time? Water and sewer monies, are they being diverted into a secret slush fund?

Disgusted said...

Even the terms on the RFP in the paper tell you the fix is in before you even go to the city web page for more details that the fix is in. The fact the city states they have the right to accept or reject any bid package as it fits their convenience or if they think that it’s in the best interest of the city is pure B.S.
All respectable RFPs from any organization list qualifications that a bidder must meet to be allowed to bid and then in some cases based on the level of involvement the bidder may have in the project, they may be required to post a bond. Once those hurtles are met (known as pre-qualifying) then in legitimate RFPs all bids should be reviewed and considered. The fix is in on this and the residents of Ogden are not being properly served nor is the administration truly putting the job out for competitive bid.

Curmudgeon said...

It costs architects money to work up presentations in response to RFPs like this one. What you have to wonder is, if it looks like this contract is wired for an FOM insider, how many architects would consider it a wise business decision to ante up the costs of a presentation if they think the deck is stacked already?

Disgusted said...

Curm,

That's the point. None

Dan S. said...

Today's S-E reports that the $15 million would come from a 5-year extension of tax incrment collection from BDO beyond its scheduled expiration in 2019.

ND said...

Provo City just came out with an RFP for design for thier new Rec Center....interestingly enough (or admirabley enough) they asked the citizens if they wanted to pay for it....imagine that....

On November 2, 2010, Provo residents indicated that they were willing to pay for a new community recreation center by approving a general obligation bond to fund the facility.

The new community recreation center should enhance the quality of life of Provo City residents by providing positive activity spaces for users while also creating a pleasing aesthetic structure and landscape. It is desirable that the massing of the exterior structure be creative and reflects the functions of the interior spaces. The Veterans Memorial Pool at North Park shall adjoin and share facilities with the new community recreation center. Other desired elements of the new facility include an indoor leisure pool, indoor competition pool (25 yards x 25 meters), locker rooms, gymnasiums, suspended running track, multi-purpose court, racquetball courts, a senior center/community spaces, administrative offices, drop-in child care, teen space, bouldering wall, concessions, weight/cardio areas, exercise studios, spinning room, etc. Work shall also include site design for parking and landscape areas, a skate park and demolition of several existing structures. The new community recreation center is projected to be about 156,000 sq. ft.

Provo City expects that the facility will contain energy efficient features and will utilize sustainable building principles. The facility will reflect creative design, connectedness to the community and cost consciousness.

Provo City projects a total construction budget of about $35.1 million. The City of Provo has agreed to administer the design, funding, construction, maintenance and operation of the facility.

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